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$500 Vanilla Reloads Selling on Ebay for $700!

Vanilla Reloads Card selling on eBay for $700

A recent Vanilla Reload listing sold on ebay

A co-worker at Internet Brands sent me this and I nearly fell of my chair when I read it. People are selling Vanilla Reload cards on eBay at massive, scalper level mark-ups. For example, this listing for a $500 card sold for $719.99!!! I understand these cards are in high demand in areas like New Jersey and Manhattan, where some stores have gone cash-only, but paying $200 for a $500 Vanilla Reload? That makes zero sense.

First off, there are still ways to generate manufactured spending at rates similar to Vanilla Reloads. Second, if you can’t use those methods, use a service like William Paid, which charges a 2.95% credit card fee – it’s still cheaper than paying a 40% markup on Vanilla Reloads.

Now some of you will be rushing to list your cards and take advantage of the massive profit margins. That is not surprising. I want to hear from those who are actually thinking of buying these cards. In what scenario does it make sense to pay $700 to buy $500? Please share your thoughts in the comment section.

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Ariana Arghandewal

21 Comments

  1. The CVS store nearest to me in Atlanta is still selling them on credit cards. I’ve read comments elsewhere that plenty of other areas are doing the same thing.

  2. Too good to be true (for the seller). Pretty sure some scamster is going to use up the balance and then file for buyer protection.

    • Someone on Twitter just told me he did this and buyers kept filing claims. Ebay sided with him and he got paid, but it was a hassle.

  3. I noticed this first about 2 months ago, before CVS stopped taking credit cards. There are more than a few completed auctions with 35-40% markup on the card. It looked too good to be true, but my investigation suggested these were being used for money laundering of drug money, which might explain the higher valuation. Anyway, I decided to post a $500 card for $690 and it sold. I was elated until I noticed that the buyer had “0” feedback. I wasn’t surprised that he/she never paid. I re-listed it, but have only received offers below the $500 face value. I’m not holding my breath. 😉

    • That’s in line with the experience others have shared on Twitter. Even if they’re purchasing them for money orders, there are cheaper ways to do this than to buy VR’s at such a high mark-up…not that I want to be one to enlighten these criminals.

  4. I could tell you why a legit seller would list it and why a legit buyer would buy it but I don’t want the whole world to know. The listing usually contains a hint though.

      • They could just do that at CVS without a markup. I’m told this is a different scam: They unload the card, then file a claim with ebay to get their money back.

        • EugeneV is indicating something different. Plus, while you could do it with cash, there’s still security cameras. eBay can be totally untraceable. It’s weak, I know; cheaper ways to do it, but that’s all I could think of.

  5. It’s a scam. Look up Amazon GCs… similar story. Is’s so they can file claims and get away with it, not because they’re actually willing to pay a premium.

    • Yeah a Twitter follower told me about it. He ran into the same problem with a buyer who filed a claim, but eventually ebay ruled in his favor.

  6. I’ve sold Visa Gift cards on Ebay for a couple of dollars profit with no issues, but not $200 more!

    • Sometimes due to price differences, taxes or tariffs people from other countries would like to make purchases from US retailers or eBay sellers, many of which require a US issued credit card. So, these people pay a small premium for GCs, register them to a maildrop address and use it this way. If they have a friend in the US, a reloadable works even better for them. But they’d pay a few bucks extra, not a few hundred. Totally different case.

      • That’s interesting. The first explanation I’ve gotten that doesn’t involve a scam.

  7. I bought another $997.90 in VR’s tonight using a CC and $999.90 in GD’s on a CC. It’s nice to live in the boondocks sometimes!

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